The road to deregulation in Ohio started twenty years ago due to over 90% of state utilities being controlled by eight major utility companies. Of the eight, the four largest companies controlled the bulk of energy production, transmission and distribution in the state. A small entity known as PUCO (Public Utilities Commission of Ohio) gave a voice to consumers but was often drowned out by the powerful energy companies.

In 1999, the path to restructuring energy for Ohioans seemed to clear with the passage of Senate Bill 3, effectively elevating the influence of PUCO, giving consumers a choice of energy provider and forcing utility companies to subdivide their services into four parts: incumbent utilities, marketers, brokers/aggregators and government aggregators.

Customers experienced changes as early as 2001 with options to shop around for energy from Certified Retail Electric Suppliers (CRES), a 5% reduction in rates and a four-year rate freeze for the free market to grow. Because rates were steady (and low!), by the end of the four-year period, relatively few Ohioans had actually taken advantage of their ability to change energy providers, and rates were headed up.

In 2005, PUCO stepped in with a plan to gently raise rates to reflect market supply and demand over the next four years while in 2008 the Ohio government passed Senate Bill 221 forcing incumbent utilities to offer a reasonable rate through a Standard Service Offer (SSO). This default option was for customers who didn't exercise their right to choose their provider. The bill also disallowed incumbent providers (who distribute energy) from also being energy generators (who produce energy).

Today, energy customers in Ohio enjoy reasonably low rates due to low natural gas options. However, total energy bills have risen due to increasing distribution costs, high-cost riders and numerous surcharges, detailed by an intriguing 2017 research study by The Ohio State University. Taking advantage of available alternatives, though, helped mitigating these costs, mainly due to higher competition, as well as fixed-plan options offered by third party suppliers. Additionally, both residential consumers and businesses have more options to choose green energy plans, helping them save the planet.

ELECTRICITY

Duke Energy Service Area

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



AEP - Ohio Power Service Area

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



AEP - Columbus Southern Service Area

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



Ohio Edison

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



Dayton Power Service Area

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



Toledo Edison

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



The Illuminating Company

(Price to Compare 9.17¢ per Kwh and average monthly usage of 650 Kwh)



NATURAL GAS

Duke Energy Service Area

(Price to Compare 62.08¢ per CCF and average monthly usage of 60 CCFs)



Vectren Energy Service Area

(Price to Compare 60.92¢ per CCF and average monthly usage of 60 CCFs)



Columbia Gas of Ohio Service Area

(Price to Compare 60.92¢ per CCF and average monthly usage of 60 CCFs)



Dominion Energy Service Area

(Price to Compare 60.92¢ per MCCF and average monthly usage of 60 MCCFs)



9.89.810.4540.849.712.2355.496.077.457.595.9610.1410.7429.657.94375.9731.87.516.635.65.455.4544.158.0740.437.4845.2410.95.943.1842.7813.726.1325.55.366.8150.885.3135.615.3511.235.399.0245.5256.4711.7311.47.9138.9647.1612.92047.1630.864.667.3530.86
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